Article Writing – Five Tips For Writing Great Medical Articles

Whether you are writing medical articles for patient brochures, blogs or article submissions, it is very important to ensure that the medical content in your article is accurate, and of a high quality. Albert Einstein once said that, “A little knowledge is a dangerous thing. So is a lot”. If you wish to write medical content, you need to follow this advice to the hilt, as what you say or don’t say, may cause people more harm than good.

Below are some tips to help you write high-quality medical articles:

Be careful about stating facts: Doctors and other medical professionals know that medical knowledge constantly changes due to advancements in new technology. It is crucial for lay writers to also understand the same, and be very careful about stating anything as an irreversible medical fact, while writing health-related articles. Many readers think that medical articles are written by medical experts, and do not understand that details may vary according to a particular case. This may result in them blindly following clearly-stated online medical advice, without consulting a medical practitioner, about their individual case.

Use proper terminology: Use the scientific or recognised medical name to describe a disease/drug, rather than a lay term, when you first mention it in your medical article. This medical name should be the word most commonly used in recently published, high-quality English content. You can use lay terms or alternative names later on, to help your readers understand the content better. This is even if you are writing medical articles for search engine optimisation purposes. One good source of disease names is WHO’s International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems.

Use ambiguous parts of speech: If you are not sure about a medical fact, even after conducting research using authentic sources of information, use ambiguous parts of speech (adverbs, nouns etc.) to describe that fact. For example, if three medical sources state different time periods (three months, five months, seven months) for dental implants to fuse with the jawbone, you can write ‘In most cases, titanium implants generally take around three to seven months to osseointegrate with the bone’.

Conduct online research carefully: As accuracy is fundamental in any medical article, you should conduct research only from reliable websites, such as those sponsored by educational institutions, medical organisations or governments. Some good sources for medical articles are the US National Library of Medicine and The American Medical Association. Another good online source is The Web MD, even though it is not a professional medical association website. Avoid using Wikipedia or other doubtful websites that constantly pop up in the top positions of search engine results.

Include a disclaimer: As legal action can sometimes be taken regarding medical content posted on a website, it is always important to include a prominent disclaimer telling readers that you are not a medical expert. This disclaimer is in addition to the legal disclaimer, generally displayed by medical practices on their website. For example: “The writer of this article is not a medical professional. Information contained herein has been collected from sources believed to be reliable, and every precaution has been taken to ensure its accuracy. The information provided here is for general informational purposes only, and should not be used as a substitute for professional medical care.

Of course, if you want great medical articles without any hassle, you could always hire a professional medical writing company, like StarEdits.com, to help you out. The specialised content writers at StarEdits have loads of experience in writing high quality medical articles, and are sure to do an awesome job for you.

Denize Rodricks is Senior Copy Editor at StarEdits Web inc

Quality Assurance – Medical Translation

Medical translation can be a minefield and specialist knowledge is required in order to gain quality assurance. It is essential that translators are used from the target language locale that have the necessary specialist medical knowledge in order to start the process of ensuring good quality. Competent editing and proof reading must ensure that the post formatting during the process does not introduce irregularities that detract from the original document.

There are numerous requirements for such types of documents globally including regulatory submissions, informed consent to be signed by patients, research protocols for which quality assurance is paramount. Documentation in clinical trials across the globe must of necessity require excellence in terms of the medical translation and quality assurance therein.

In the last two decades, Review Boards have been set up to protect the client subjects and to ensure good quality assurance in the field of medical translation. In 2008 the Medical Research Council in the UK put into place a new strategy to underpin key areas including developmental research, methodology, training and partnerships in support of translational activity.

When undertaking medical translation there should be a mandate for clear communication which includes specific protocols for translation quality assurance. It is essential that any anticipated risks to subjects during research are clearly understood and that informed consent documents are signed only when there is confidence that the nature of the research is conveyed accurately, that the medical translation has been undertaken with the specific medical knowledge and target language required.

When enrolling non-English speaking students, documents should be translated to the language they read, speak and understand.

Quality assurance can also be met when considering medical translation by using bidirectional process. This of course will incur further costs during translation but can ensure the initial document is fully understood. However, it is important to bear in mind that the document coming back may not be a true reflection of the original since many words and phrases can be lost in translation according to the target language.

Medical Assistant Training Career Path Options

A medical assistant has the option, with the right training, experience and qualifications, to make a major transition and cross train into a number of rewarding and challenging health care careers.

Utilize your training and go from being a medical assistant to:

Nursing – LPN or RN

For highly skilled and dedicated medical assistant technicians who are ready to explore other health service occupations, becoming a licensed practical nurse (LPN) or a registered nurse (RN) can be an enticing option.

Medical Records Technician

Medical records technicians are heavily involved in making sure data is properly recorded and utilized. Between the patient and the doctor, medical records technicians are recognized as a vital link. They also play an extremely important role in overseeing administrative activities of medical offices. It would be difficult to disseminate needed information to staff and patients without the help of skilled and competent medical records technicians.

Medical Data Assistant

Take your medical assistant training and skills and cross train to become a medical data assistant. The training you will receive in terminology, transcription and coding can prepare you for numerous positions that require a broad base of medical knowledge. Medical data assistants perform such tasks as keying medical data into databases, providing front-desk services and appointment scheduling for patients.

Medical Billing and Coding Specialist

To successfully cross train, candidates must be up on the latest industry insurance rules, medical billing practices and lab procedures. The training that medical billing and coding specialists receive prepares them to accurately process critical information and data about patients.

Medical Transcriptionists

Consider transferring the medical assistant training and skills you have developed to become a medical transcriptionist. Clinics, hospitals and medical insurance companies, to name a few, often value competent medical transcriptionist candidates who can hit the ground running on day one of the job.

Pharmacy Aid

Becoming a pharmacy aid allows medical assistants to apply the skills learned to a pharmacy setting. Duties may include delivering drugs to the pharmacy, accepting store merchandise and keeping supplies stocked.

Physical Therapist Assistant

A physical therapist assistant, familiar with cold and heat therapy applications and techniques, may, with additional training, become a member of a therapeutic team in hospitals, physicians’ offices, outpatient clinics and other locations.

Health Service Occupations

Additional training and a strong sense of motivation can lead to employment in such health service occupations as an X-ray for EKG technician, dental assistant, surgical technologist, massage therapist or RN.

Nursing Assistant

A trained medical assistant may even opt to become a nursing assistant to help to support hospital-nursing staff. It is a tough job, often requiring heavy lifting of patients and clean up.

Certified Medical Assistant

A certified medical assistant (CMA) is qualified to perform a score of important duties in at the medical clinic or doctor’s office. While non-certified assistants may, in many cases, be able to perform at the same level as a CMA, the certification designates an individual has the knowledge and capabilities to form at the highest level of expectation for his or her profession.

General Medical Knowledge About Neurological Examination

In neurological diagnosis, a properly taken history is one of the most important and helpful tools for the physician. Broadly, neurological disorders may be divided into four main pathological classes-vascular accidents, inflammations, neplasia and space occupying lesions and degenerations. Vascular accidents such as embolism, thrombosis, and hemorrhage come on abruptly, often within minutes to hours. In embolism, the neurological deficit is maximal at the start, and tends to wear off with time. In thrombotic lesions often, there are warning transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) and the whole process may take a few to several hours. In hemorrhage, into the brain, onset may be sudden or more prolonged. Initial symptoms such as severe headache, vomitin and sudden loss of consciousness may suggest a hemorrhagic stroke. Inflammatory lesions (eg, meningitis, encephalitis, and brain abscess) start acutely and they evolve over a period of days to weeks. In addition to the neurological features, they are usually accompanied by signs of systemic infection such as fever and toxemia.

generally, space occupying lesions have sub-acute onset and course progressing to the full fledged stage over a period of weeks to months. The progress may be steady or punctuated by periodic exacerbation caused by complications such as vascular thrombosis, hemorrhage or edema in the tumor. Degenerative lesions (eg, presenile dementia, spinocerebella degeneration) have a very insidious onset and progressive course extending over several years.

Higher functions: These include the level of consciousness, intelligence, memory, emotional state, and speech. These are all cortical functions. These are deranged in cortical lesions.

Speech: speech disturbance may be due to defects in articulation (dysarthria), disturbance of structure and organization of language (aphasia), or disturbance of phonation (aphonia).

Dysarthria: There are three main types of dysarthria. In cerebellar disease, the speech is slow, deliberate, and scanning or staccato.

In bilateral pyramidal lesion occurring above the level of the brainstem, the speech is spastic. This is also known as pseudobulbar dysarthria. Such patients show evidence of upper motor neuron lesion of the cranial nerves supplying the muscles of the face, larynx, tongue, and respiration. Spaticity of the muscles supplied by the bulbar nuclei gives rise to slurring speech which may be compared to that of a drunken man. Other associated features such as dysphagia are present because of spasticity of the muscles of deglutition.
Lower motor neuron lesion of the muscles supplied by the brainstem nuclei gives rise to ‘bulbar dysarthria’. The speech is slurred. Other evidences of lower cranial nerve palsies such as dysphagia and nasal regurgitation of fluids may coexist.

Aphonia: Inability to produce sounds while still able to make syllables and gestures is termed aphonia. This may be organic as a result of bulbar or pseudobulbar palsy or it may be a hysterical phenomenon.

Aphasia: Several parts of the cerebral cortex take part in speech function. These are the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, occipital lobe, and the motor cortex. Aphasia is the inability to use language an this may involve speaking, writing and comprehending. The defect lies in the central mechanisms of speech. Aphasia has been classified differently by several authors. Ability to use language can be found to be made up of several discrete components which act together to produce normal speech.

1. Ability to use words in spoken speech- This consists of articulation, ability to put words together into phrases and grammatical constrictions (fluency), naming and accurate repetition of complex statements and concepts;
2. Comprehension of spoken speech;
3. Ability to read;
4. Ability to write; and
5. Ability to comprehend symbols, eg, mathematical symbols, musical symbols etc.

Defects of speech may give rise to disturbances of articulation, fluency, verbal comprehension, naming, repetition, reading and writing. Lesions in different regions of the brain affect these modalities differently.

I. Anterior temporal lobe lesions (amnestic or Wernicke’s aphasia): Disturbances of fluency verbal comprehension, repetition and writing.
2. Left frontal lesions- Articulation and fluency are mainly affected.
3. Left parieto-occipital regions- Impairment of reading (visual language functions).
4. Left parietal region- Writing is particularly impaired.

In right-handed individuals, the main speech center is in the left cerebral hemisphere which is termed the dominant hemisphere. The left cerebral hemisphere is dominant in many left-handed subjects as well.

In clinical practice, it is easier to assess articulation and fluency on the one hand and reading and writing on the other. In lesions anterior to the Rolandic fissure, the former are more, affected whereas in posterior lesions, the latter are more affected. These are therefore referred to as anterior (also called expressive0 and posterior (also called receptive) aphasias.

In lesions involving the motor cortex (left frontal and temporal lesions) due to disturbance in voluntary movement of the lips and tongue, orofacial apraxia may develop and may add an element of cortical dysarthria to aphasia. In anterior aphasias, the patient is unable to express words and words are substituted, eg, calling a pen, a knife, etc. In lesions of the left posterior temporal region. speech is made up only of asyllabic neologisms without producing any normal sense. This is called jargon aphasia. There is considerable impairment of comprehension of spoken speech defects repetition of spoken words is possible, while in posterior defects this is not so.

In addition to spoken speech, testing the capacity to read and write gives important clues. The visual comprehension of language and spoken speech are tested by making the subject read loudly. Silent reading tests the comprehension of language. Inability to write is called dysgraphia. Repeated use of the same word inappropriately is called preseveration. Inability to understand and manipulate mathematic symbols is called acalulia. Expressive ideas through gestures and understanding them is known as gesture speech. Patients with Wernicke’s aphasia (temporal lobe)) or with posterior aphasias do not understand gesture speech.

Apraxia: The inability to perform complex acts in the absence of motor or sensory paralysis is known as apraxia. Such subjects may be able to perform the components of such acts but are unable to complete them. Apractic subjects cannot make use of objects, though their use will be recognized by them. For example the patient may know the use of a pencil, but when asked to write he may not be able to do so. Apraxia results from damage to left parietal Cortex, Parietal white matter of left or both hemisphere or the interhemispherical fibers through the corpus callosum.

The General Significance and Medical Knowledge About Pulmonary Collapse

When a portion of the lung becomes airless, it is termed collapse or atelectasis. Collapse may be present from birth, when a portion of the lung fails to expand. Acquired collapse is more common and this is caused by absorption of air from a previously normal lung. This is a case worth knowing because it affects a considerable percentage of the world population which should bring some concern.

Causes
1. Obstruction to the air passages: The air passages may be obstructed by intraluminal or extraluminal causes, as in the following examples.
1. Tumors of the bronchus (carcinoma, adenoma, etc), bronchial stenosis, extrinsic pressure on the air passages.
2. Copious secretions and thick plugs of mucus cause obstruction in patients in whom the cough mechanism is ineffective.
3. Inhaled foreign bodies or aspirated material
4. Extrinsic pressure on the bronchus by lymph nodes, tumors, etc. For example middle lobe syndrome in pulmonary tuberculosis.

2. Pneumothorax and pleural effusion. In bronchial obstruction, the air already present in the alveoli is absorbed. The lobe or segment shrinks due to its inherent elastic recoil. Functional defect depends upon the extent of lung tissue affected.

Clinical picture
Symptoms depend upon the extent of collapse and its onset. Acute lesions are more symptomatic than chronic ones. Small areas of atelectasis may be asymptomatic. Massive collapse gives rise to dyspnea with or without cyanosis. The movement of affected side is reduced and the chest is flattened. Trachea and Cardiac apex are shifted to the same side. Percussion note over the collapsed lung is diminished. Adventitious sounds are usually absent. In many cases, the cause is aspiration and signs of aspiration pneumonia develop.

Investigations
1. RADIOLOGY: Skiagrams show the collapsed portion as homogenous opacities with sharp concave borders. Both the posterioanterior and lateral views are required for proper localization.
2. BRONCHOSCOPY: It is necessary to visualize the affected bronchi. It also helps in clearing the obstructing cause.
3. BRONCHOGRAPHY: It reveals the actual site and nature of the block.

Complications and sequelae
Pulmonary collapse leads on to infection, abscess formation, and fibrosis of the affected segment. Bronchiectasis may develop as a late sequel.

Management
Emergency measures include removal of the obstructive cause and physiotherapy to expand the lung. Antibiotic therapy should be started to prevent aspiration pneumonia. Pleural diseases must be treated promptly to prevent permanent damage to the lungs.

Preventions
Proper physiotherapy and measures to protect the respiratory tract from aspiration of gastric contents for a long way in preventing pulmonary collapse.

For Medical Students – 3 Ways to Make Money Online

Medical students are perhaps the most financially burdened group in the country. Not only is the tuition expensive, their busy schedules essential make holding part-time jobs impossible. A majority of medical students end up with more than $100,000 of student loans. Sure, they may come out of the hole in the future. But before that happens, they need to be able to support themselves while they are still in medical school.

There are a lot of ways to make money online. But as a medical student, you do not have luxury of time to do everything. You need to focus on something that you are already good at. Medical knowledge, check. Health care and administration knowledge, check. Getting more information on human conditions, check. Cranking out reports, double check. Here are 3 ways you can utilize your expertise online:

1. Writing Articles as An Affiliate Marketer

As a medical student, you are the selected few who can both understand and have access to the most current medical knowledge. You are in a unique position to write some basic yet informative articles to websites like this one. To make money from them, all you need to do is to find some health-related products such as weight loss or workout products and earn commissions as an affiliate seller. Because of your education, you can write better reports and reviews than the rest of us ever could.

2. Writing Articles for Other Affiliate Marketers

Although you will make more money by doing article marketing yourself, you can get paid quicker and easier by writing for other marketers selling health-related products.

3. Blogging

Blogging is very similar to article marketing. The only different is that you use your own blog as your publishing platform. If you put expert medical information on your blog periodically, you will get a lot of visitors. You can then make money either by doing affiliate marketing or through advertisement.

Note that these marketing methods will cost you very little study time. All you have to do is to write one or two short articles per day on something you are studying. Your online income will gradually build up over time. When you are writing, be sure to simply the language for the laypeople. Also, pay attention not to violate any medical school policy or patient right.

General Medical Knowledge About Neurological Examination

In neurological diagnosis, a properly taken history is one of the most important and helpful tools for the physician. Broadly, neurological disorders may be divided into four main pathological classes-vascular accidents, inflammations, neplasia and space occupying lesions and degenerations. Vascular accidents such as embolism, thrombosis, and hemorrhage come on abruptly, often within minutes to hours. In embolism, the neurological deficit is maximal at the start, and tends to wear off with time. In thrombotic lesions often, there are warning transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) and the whole process may take a few to several hours. In hemorrhage, into the brain, onset may be sudden or more prolonged. Initial symptoms such as severe headache, vomitin and sudden loss of consciousness may suggest a hemorrhagic stroke. Inflammatory lesions (eg, meningitis, encephalitis, and brain abscess) start acutely and they evolve over a period of days to weeks. In addition to the neurological features, they are usually accompanied by signs of systemic infection such as fever and toxemia.

generally, space occupying lesions have sub-acute onset and course progressing to the full fledged stage over a period of weeks to months. The progress may be steady or punctuated by periodic exacerbation caused by complications such as vascular thrombosis, hemorrhage or edema in the tumor. Degenerative lesions (eg, presenile dementia, spinocerebella degeneration) have a very insidious onset and progressive course extending over several years.

Higher functions: These include the level of consciousness, intelligence, memory, emotional state, and speech. These are all cortical functions. These are deranged in cortical lesions.

Speech: speech disturbance may be due to defects in articulation (dysarthria), disturbance of structure and organization of language (aphasia), or disturbance of phonation (aphonia).

Dysarthria: There are three main types of dysarthria. In cerebellar disease, the speech is slow, deliberate, and scanning or staccato.

In bilateral pyramidal lesion occurring above the level of the brainstem, the speech is spastic. This is also known as pseudobulbar dysarthria. Such patients show evidence of upper motor neuron lesion of the cranial nerves supplying the muscles of the face, larynx, tongue, and respiration. Spaticity of the muscles supplied by the bulbar nuclei gives rise to slurring speech which may be compared to that of a drunken man. Other associated features such as dysphagia are present because of spasticity of the muscles of deglutition.
Lower motor neuron lesion of the muscles supplied by the brainstem nuclei gives rise to ‘bulbar dysarthria’. The speech is slurred. Other evidences of lower cranial nerve palsies such as dysphagia and nasal regurgitation of fluids may coexist.

Aphonia: Inability to produce sounds while still able to make syllables and gestures is termed aphonia. This may be organic as a result of bulbar or pseudobulbar palsy or it may be a hysterical phenomenon.

Aphasia: Several parts of the cerebral cortex take part in speech function. These are the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, occipital lobe, and the motor cortex. Aphasia is the inability to use language an this may involve speaking, writing and comprehending. The defect lies in the central mechanisms of speech. Aphasia has been classified differently by several authors. Ability to use language can be found to be made up of several discrete components which act together to produce normal speech.

1. Ability to use words in spoken speech- This consists of articulation, ability to put words together into phrases and grammatical constrictions (fluency), naming and accurate repetition of complex statements and concepts;
2. Comprehension of spoken speech;
3. Ability to read;
4. Ability to write; and
5. Ability to comprehend symbols, eg, mathematical symbols, musical symbols etc.

Defects of speech may give rise to disturbances of articulation, fluency, verbal comprehension, naming, repetition, reading and writing. Lesions in different regions of the brain affect these modalities differently.

I. Anterior temporal lobe lesions (amnestic or Wernicke’s aphasia): Disturbances of fluency verbal comprehension, repetition and writing.
2. Left frontal lesions- Articulation and fluency are mainly affected.
3. Left parieto-occipital regions- Impairment of reading (visual language functions).
4. Left parietal region- Writing is particularly impaired.

In right-handed individuals, the main speech center is in the left cerebral hemisphere which is termed the dominant hemisphere. The left cerebral hemisphere is dominant in many left-handed subjects as well.

In clinical practice, it is easier to assess articulation and fluency on the one hand and reading and writing on the other. In lesions anterior to the Rolandic fissure, the former are more, affected whereas in posterior lesions, the latter are more affected. These are therefore referred to as anterior (also called expressive0 and posterior (also called receptive) aphasias.

In lesions involving the motor cortex (left frontal and temporal lesions) due to disturbance in voluntary movement of the lips and tongue, orofacial apraxia may develop and may add an element of cortical dysarthria to aphasia. In anterior aphasias, the patient is unable to express words and words are substituted, eg, calling a pen, a knife, etc. In lesions of the left posterior temporal region. speech is made up only of asyllabic neologisms without producing any normal sense. This is called jargon aphasia. There is considerable impairment of comprehension of spoken speech defects repetition of spoken words is possible, while in posterior defects this is not so.

In addition to spoken speech, testing the capacity to read and write gives important clues. The visual comprehension of language and spoken speech are tested by making the subject read loudly. Silent reading tests the comprehension of language. Inability to write is called dysgraphia. Repeated use of the same word inappropriately is called preseveration. Inability to understand and manipulate mathematic symbols is called acalulia. Expressive ideas through gestures and understanding them is known as gesture speech. Patients with Wernicke’s aphasia (temporal lobe)) or with posterior aphasias do not understand gesture speech.

Apraxia: The inability to perform complex acts in the absence of motor or sensory paralysis is known as apraxia. Such subjects may be able to perform the components of such acts but are unable to complete them. Apractic subjects cannot make use of objects, though their use will be recognized by them. For example the patient may know the use of a pencil, but when asked to write he may not be able to do so. Apraxia results from damage to left parietal Cortex, Parietal white matter of left or both hemisphere or the interhemispherical fibers through the corpus callosum.

The General Significance and Medical Knowledge About Pulmonary Collapse

When a portion of the lung becomes airless, it is termed collapse or atelectasis. Collapse may be present from birth, when a portion of the lung fails to expand. Acquired collapse is more common and this is caused by absorption of air from a previously normal lung. This is a case worth knowing because it affects a considerable percentage of the world population which should bring some concern.

Causes
1. Obstruction to the air passages: The air passages may be obstructed by intraluminal or extraluminal causes, as in the following examples.
1. Tumors of the bronchus (carcinoma, adenoma, etc), bronchial stenosis, extrinsic pressure on the air passages.
2. Copious secretions and thick plugs of mucus cause obstruction in patients in whom the cough mechanism is ineffective.
3. Inhaled foreign bodies or aspirated material
4. Extrinsic pressure on the bronchus by lymph nodes, tumors, etc. For example middle lobe syndrome in pulmonary tuberculosis.

2. Pneumothorax and pleural effusion. In bronchial obstruction, the air already present in the alveoli is absorbed. The lobe or segment shrinks due to its inherent elastic recoil. Functional defect depends upon the extent of lung tissue affected.

Clinical picture
Symptoms depend upon the extent of collapse and its onset. Acute lesions are more symptomatic than chronic ones. Small areas of atelectasis may be asymptomatic. Massive collapse gives rise to dyspnea with or without cyanosis. The movement of affected side is reduced and the chest is flattened. Trachea and Cardiac apex are shifted to the same side. Percussion note over the collapsed lung is diminished. Adventitious sounds are usually absent. In many cases, the cause is aspiration and signs of aspiration pneumonia develop.

Investigations
1. RADIOLOGY: Skiagrams show the collapsed portion as homogenous opacities with sharp concave borders. Both the posterioanterior and lateral views are required for proper localization.
2. BRONCHOSCOPY: It is necessary to visualize the affected bronchi. It also helps in clearing the obstructing cause.
3. BRONCHOGRAPHY: It reveals the actual site and nature of the block.

Complications and sequelae
Pulmonary collapse leads on to infection, abscess formation, and fibrosis of the affected segment. Bronchiectasis may develop as a late sequel.

Management
Emergency measures include removal of the obstructive cause and physiotherapy to expand the lung. Antibiotic therapy should be started to prevent aspiration pneumonia. Pleural diseases must be treated promptly to prevent permanent damage to the lungs.

Preventions
Proper physiotherapy and measures to protect the respiratory tract from aspiration of gastric contents for a long way in preventing pulmonary collapse.

For Medical Students – 3 Ways to Make Money Online

Medical students are perhaps the most financially burdened group in the country. Not only is the tuition expensive, their busy schedules essential make holding part-time jobs impossible. A majority of medical students end up with more than $100,000 of student loans. Sure, they may come out of the hole in the future. But before that happens, they need to be able to support themselves while they are still in medical school.

There are a lot of ways to make money online. But as a medical student, you do not have luxury of time to do everything. You need to focus on something that you are already good at. Medical knowledge, check. Health care and administration knowledge, check. Getting more information on human conditions, check. Cranking out reports, double check. Here are 3 ways you can utilize your expertise online:

1. Writing Articles as An Affiliate Marketer

As a medical student, you are the selected few who can both understand and have access to the most current medical knowledge. You are in a unique position to write some basic yet informative articles to websites like this one. To make money from them, all you need to do is to find some health-related products such as weight loss or workout products and earn commissions as an affiliate seller. Because of your education, you can write better reports and reviews than the rest of us ever could.

2. Writing Articles for Other Affiliate Marketers

Although you will make more money by doing article marketing yourself, you can get paid quicker and easier by writing for other marketers selling health-related products.

3. Blogging

Blogging is very similar to article marketing. The only different is that you use your own blog as your publishing platform. If you put expert medical information on your blog periodically, you will get a lot of visitors. You can then make money either by doing affiliate marketing or through advertisement.

Note that these marketing methods will cost you very little study time. All you have to do is to write one or two short articles per day on something you are studying. Your online income will gradually build up over time. When you are writing, be sure to simply the language for the laypeople. Also, pay attention not to violate any medical school policy or patient right.

Reasons Why Your Medical Career Crashes

Once you become a doctor, it marks a turning point at which most doctors start slipping backwards. There’s a reason!
Your burning passion and rugged determination for your medical career goals is not enough to overcome the barriers to your planned and expected maximum success in medical practice. It’s a reality that you shouldn’t have to face, and that you don’t deserve.

There are reasons why and what you can do about it. It’s one of the most distressing, yet understandable, factors leading to career failure. The meaning of failure as used here is the complete inability of over 95% of doctors to reach their maximum potential as a doctor.

It also includes your inability to create and maintain a medical practice that will ever reach the profitability potential it has the capacity to foster. In clearer terms, unless you are prepared to do what needs to be done to reach those highest levels of accomplishments, you will fail to a significant degree.

The inability refers to the absence of training and education that are required to rise above the others. As a result you are effectively programmed to fail by the institution that qualified you to be a doctor.

Consider a few factors that lead you to this unholy position:
You have not been provided with the essential tools to run your medical practice business efficiently and profitably. It means you have no business or marketing training or education.

A challenge to your intellect and common sense:
Is it possible in our present economic environment to create a successful, constantly growing, medical practice business when the doctor owner has no real knowledge about how to do that effectively without expert help?

A “no” answer indicates you are quite comfortable about extracting from your medical career just enough abundance and satisfaction to make do. In other words, you are a hostage to your circumstances.

A “yes” answer indicates that you have not yet matured in business far enough to recognize that all of your sheer-brilliance in medical knowledge is never enough to create a maximally productive medical practice business-just enough to get by with for a while.

You have “educational burnout” without even recognizing it. The evidence of this is obvious when you consider these issues:

Why is it necessary to require doctors to complete CME hours for maintaining medical licensure?
Why is it compulsory to recertify for specialty credentialing?
Why is it that once you start medical practice there is no urgency or self-implied obligation to voluntarily maintain and continually update your medical knowledge?
Why is it that the need to have a business education is such an unnecessary and objectionable necessity that is totally ignored by most doctors? Yes, you promised yourself there would be no more burning the midnight oil again.

What possible reason would medical education pundits have to neglect the need to provide a business as well as medical education to medical students? Could it be that they knew about the educational burnout phenomenon and didn’t want that to happen during your medical education and training? But was it OK if it came afterwords?

Your passion for practicing medicine gradually becomes crowded out of your mind. That’s because once you become aware of the fact that your medical career is not able to provide you with the higher goals you had in mind at the start and turned out to be only a pipedream in reality.

For those doctors who already have wealth and adequate funding, there seems to be no real concern about these kinds of issues. However, for most doctors that is not the case. My concern is about the latter.

The real life examples of how these arcane factors are born:
The sequence of ominous changes in your passion for your medical career is one of the most distressing, yet understandable, factors leading to career failure. It begins with graduation from medical school, sometimes even sooner. It’s something older doctors see in their rear view mirror.

Prestige, recognition, fulfillment, happiness and expectations in your medical career seldom increase with time but rather fade with time. As you proceed in your medical career goal setting beyond medical school, the bright lights, celebrations and spectacular accomplishments disappear in the sunset. It starts almost immediately on entering your medical practice.

The day you completed your internship, were you given a loud sendoff, glory and recognition that would shake the pillars of medicine? Did you deserve that? Absolutely… but it doesn’t happen.

The revelation suddenly hits you in the face that there will be no more public pats-on-the-back. From now on your dedication to your obligations and career success becomes an investment in personal satisfaction.

Your reward for completing a residency in your specialty is simply whittled down to a medical certificate of residency completion, not a rousing cheering crowd. Your self-esteem benefits, but your wallet suffers.

Either you are headed for private medical practice of some nature, or you are feeling the overpowering need for security by becoming an employed physician.
Right here at the end of all your formal medical training, you are at the highest level of your medical knowledge with the incredible skills and ambition to take-on any of medical practice challenges put in front of you. From here on you are on your own.

No one is there to push or inspire you further and higher, except yourself. Previously, you had back up. Now you don’t. Even your family that has not lived in your shoes themselves can’t really help you much in your medical career choices and goals.

The next step in your career is even more stressful. And it’s outrageously insulting to all new doctors. Why? Because you don’t deserve this second step of disappointment as your reward for years of sacrifice and struggle.

Medical practice becomes your next teacher and mentor:
This new environment of medical practice has a bundle of harsh lessons to teach you. Of course, no one has discussed these things with you in any depth because they didn’t want to discourage you. These soft lies of omission leave scars. It leaves you na├»ve and vulnerable, which is much worse than giving you the truth to begin with.

This one thing is far more damaging to your medical career than you can believe. Every medical doctor is affected to a significant degree during his or her career as a result of being forced to adapt to the persistence of unexpected events that they could have prepared for if someone had told them what’s ahead.

Can you imagine how much stress in your practice over the years could have been prevented by knowing and preparing?

What are your options for avoiding or resolving these destructive factors regarding your medical practice career?
As with the activities and strategies required for success, there is no one simple laser-guided response for every person to follow to arrive at their personal highest level of achievement that they call “success.”

However, there is only one commonality found among the successful people that you may not care to hear about.

“It is a stronger, deeper, more unrelenting commitment to success far beyond what most ever marshal.”
(Source: No B.S. Marketing Letter, GKIC, Dan S. Kennedy, Nov. 2012)

This simple golden rule of success implies that we must reach a point in time when our minds become aware of the chain of events, predictable side effects, and consequences that are adherent to your decisions. Thus, it enables you to correctly ascertain whether a decision you make is complimentary to your objective, diverges from your objective or is in direct conflict with your objective.

Your decisions about your medical career are even more complex than any you have previously made. It involves making good decisions at the start but doesn’t exclude good decisions being made throughout your medical practice years.

For most doctors and other medical professionals who haven’t lost their desire to perform at maximum levels, it will often require one or more of the following:

1. You must know yourself:
What are your skills, talents, interests, activities that create satisfaction, biases, and toleration limits, among others? You need to spend a few hours quietly putting these attributes in order, even in priority. Sometimes it takes several sessions with other people (usually parents) who know you quite well and listening to what they see in you that you don’t see.

Many college graduates are unaware of who they really are inside, and what capacity they have to succeed. Therefore, they stumble along relying on their “above average” intelligence to keep them on track to a few objectives.

If you aren’t aware of what you need to do to be happy with your life and profession by the time you finish college, you are likely not to discover that later on. This factor becomes a life long millstone around your neck.

2. You must continue to set goals to be accomplished during your whole life:
Without goals, you lose your passion and determination. Over 95% of doctors are hamstrung because they either have no idea what they are really capable of accomplishing, or have fears that prevent them from moving to higher levels of accomplishment such as:

Fear of being taken advantage of-easily led astray-analytical minded.
Fear of not being a success-of failing.
Fear of not fitting in-ostracized by peers-not a leader-hidesin the herd.
Fear of lack of approval of peers and friends-always social, energetic and fun-loving are the cover-up features.

You don’t set goals because of these same fears. It’s why so many great people tell you to face you fears and go right on through them no matter what.

3. Don’t expect a blueprint for success:
Lee Milteer, professional highly regarded business mentor, says, “Success Is an Inside Job”. She teaches that you create your own success using the path from “visualization” to “mindset”. If you don’t understand that process, you need to find out how it works and trust it.

4. Create a laser focus on one primary objective:
When you dilute your path with multiple goals, you are multitasking and are constantly changing decisions. You have set yourself up for a watered-down life and career.

If you find you have chosen the wrong objective, then move to a new focus on another primary objective. Never focus on more than one.

5. Real success in your medical career often results from maintaining your family obligations:
Your level of success is corrupted when you neglect your family relationships. Divorce, broken homes, financial disasters, and lack of a religious heart results in not being able to fully enjoy your success when and if it arrives.

6. Make your personal integrity the basis of your career:
Your integrity creates your character that others see and respect. You maintain the principles you live by under all circumstances in your profession. When your “word” is unreliable, you corrupt everything around you one way or another. You then live off the garbage other people discard.

There are many more examples of solutions you probably have experienced and know the value of that may be just as important as the ones I’ve mentioned above. If you thought I was going to give you a 1-2-3-4-5 answer to gaining total control of your medical career, you haven’t been reading between the lines of this article well enough.

Business experts universally agree that medical doctors are set-up to fail. If you care to debate the point, you should start by reading what Michael Gerber, business expert and author, has confirmed by working with many doctors over many years. He presents that in his best selling book, The E-Myth: Physician. Give yourself a huge dose of reality! Then swallow it with a gracious flow of genius.